Butterick 6134 with Zipper Collar and Decorative Cover Stitch

Often I find myself making the same pattern twice, just a few weeks or months apart. Working on the first make gives me ideas for new interpretations. Sometimes I’m so excited about the new ideas that I don’t wait long to tackle them. This is one of those projects.

A few weeks ago I used some double sided athletic knit to make a pullover top and pants. I used Butterick 6134 for the pullover top, but due to unfortunate circumstances, I had to cut away the funnel neck and substitute a mock neck. After completing the top, I thought it was a bit dark and dull so I reverse cover stitched along the princess seam lines with black and white variegated thread

And that’s where I got the idea to use this pattern to make a pullover with a wide, zippered collar, and coverstitch embellishment accenting the seamlines.

I used a wool/bamboo/spandex jersey from Fabric Mart. This cut was lighter and softer than I expected. It is NOT a winter warm cozy knit, instead, it’s a wonderful spring or fall or chilly summer evening knit. It’s also great for active wear. It’s soft and breathes, and wool retains warmth even when it’s wet. I think this is going to be my go-to workout top.

I cut the pieces and stitched the side fronts to the center front on the machine with a narrow zigzag stitch and a full 5/8 seam allowance. Then I flipped the piece and with the inside up and the outside down, using cover needles 1 & 3, I cover stitched along the princess seam with blue variegated thread in the looper. Then I stitched the front and back sleeve sections together, with a narrow zigzag and full seam allowance. Then I flipped it and cover stitched along the seam line with the outside down. I sewed the side seams and sleeve underarm seams directly on the serger. Then I applied the raglan sleeves to the top. It was a lot harder to flip the whole thing and cover stitch along the front and back seams. So I started at the underarm and stitch up on the front, then the back, then repeated on the other side. Unfortunately, I managed to leave a small gap on the cover stitching, but fortunately it’s located directly in the arm pit.

Now for the collar. I didn’t have enough material to cut the collar out in one piece on a fold, so there’s a center back seam. I sewed the cb seam first. Then, I had to figure out how to install the zipper. If I had thought this through from the start, I would have turned half the collar inside out, sewn in the zip, repeated on the other side, then sewn the center back seam last. But, I did not think this through and had already sewn that center back seam. So with the collar right sides out, I tucked the raw edges in, pushed the zipper tape in, pinned it and topstitched it all in place. Not the best installation, but it worked.

I wasn’t sure how to attach the collar to the neck. I finally ended up just sewing it to the neck, right sides together. I flipped the seam allowance down to the bodice, and stitched it down with an upside down cover stitch, like the decorative cover stitch along the seams. The final step was heming the sleeves and hem with the cover stitch, upside down, and trimming the excess from neck, sleeves and hem.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Pullover tops with princess seams, raglan sleeves and funnel neck

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Except for my design changes, yes

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
I’ve made this pattern before, and I was focused on the decorative stitching, so I didn’t refer to the instructions. Plus, the collar was my own thing

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I really like the combination of raglan sleeves and princess seam. I used a different collar for this make, but I do like the funnel neck on this pattern

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Wool/Bamboo/Spandex jersey from Fabric Mart

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
Replaced the funnel neck with a big, floppy collar featuring a zip

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and Yes

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Kwik Sew 3121 Embroidered Wool Jersey Pullover

This OOP is a simple, boxy pullover. I’ve made it up as shown on the pattern envelope, used it as a starting point for other designs. and grafted details from snug fitting patterns onto this one.

This make is a basic pullover with a lapped V neck, spiced up with embroidered peacock feathers.

The feathers are Momo Dini Peacock feathers. The feathers are mostly running stitch, making them light and airy and perfect for embroidering on stretchy fabrics. I did NOT follow the color charts. Instead, I used several shades of blue and variegated blue rayon embroidery threads. I used a different mix of colors for each feather, because I wanted every feather to be unique.

Everything I found about machine embroidery said it’s best to stitch the design, then cut the pattern piece out. But, I couldn’t imagine handling over 2 yards of 58 wide fabric like that! So, I outlined the pattern pieces with a pen. Yes, a pen. I wanted to be able to see where the cutting line was, and when I cut the pieces out, I knew any pen marks that weren’t cut away would land, and hide, in the seam allowance.

Then, I cut a rectangle around the pattern piece. This way the shape itself was not cut out until the embroidery was complete, so if necessary, I could slightly adjust the position of the pattern shape on the embroidered fabric. And I didn’t have to struggle with a pile of excess fabric.

I used a sticky back water soluble stabilizer in the hoop. I positioned the fabric on the sticky stabilizer, and pressed it down firmly. Everything stayed nicely in place. After completing each feather, I gently removed most of the excess stabilizer, leaving the stuff behind the feather. I hooped a new piece of stabilizer, positioned the fabric, and stitched the next feather.

I wasn’t too precise about positioning the feathers on the fabric. I wanted it to feel like they just floated down and landed.

After completing the embroidery, I cut out the pattern pieces. I didn’t bother machine basting the bodice and sleeves, I sewed them up right on the serger.

I like the lapped V look. I see it in RTW, but rarely in home sewing. I think it’s a little easier than a miter V, but it can be tricky. I think the only place I’ve seen this technique described is in the active wear section of a Singer how to sew book.

I finished the hem and sleeves with a cover stitch. I used my Evolve, cover needles 2 and 3, with variegated thread in the looper,

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Loose fitting pullover top with neck variations

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Yes, with a V neck

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
I lost the instructions. But, t’s a very easy pattern and I’ve made it before.

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I like that it’s a simple basic. It looks nice as is or works as a solid base for a new design

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Merino wool jersey from Fabric Mart

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
I made a v neck with a lapped band.

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and Yes

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McCalls 6612 Easy Cowl Neck Sweater

McCalls 6612 is my cowl neck TNT. I love the way this self-faced cowl drapes. I did raise the back neck a LOT, because the pattern back neck drops quite low. I also pulled it in at the sides, so it’s less boaty.

It’s a very easy pattern, ideal for beginners. There’s three pieces, front, back and sleeve. The cowl, cowl lining, and front are all cut on one piece.

For this make I used black polyester hacci sweater knit from Fabric Mart. I bought a piece of this in purple, sewed it up, and loved it so much I bought three more pieces in different colors, including this black piece, when it went on sale again. It looks washed out in the photo, probably from the flash. In person it is rich, dark black.

I like making basic pieces. I wear basic pieces, like cowl neck pullovers, daily, so I get to wear my makes a lot. This make was an “instant gratification” piece.

I used the sewing machine and a narrow zig zag stitch to finish the cowl/lining edge, and the shoulder seam. I sewed a strip of twill tape into the shoulders seams so they’ll keep their shape.

I seldom sew directly on the serger. I prefer to machine baste everything, even though it’s much more time consuming. I truly HATE tearing out serged seams. And trying to rip them out usually chews up what little is left of the seam allowance. So, basting takes longer, but is much easier and quicker to fix if something goes wrong.

But, because this is a TNT I knew it was Ok to go straight to the serger to finish off the shoulder seams, and sew the side seams and sleeve underarm seams. I used the sewing machine to set the sleeves in place, then finished the armhole seams with the serger.

I used my Evolve cover stitch, needles  2 & 3, to finish the sleeves and hem. I used black thread in the needles, and variegated black and white thread in the looper.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Close-fitting, pullover dresses have neckline/sleeve variations and narrow hem. A: Elasticized, ruched side seams and three-quarter length sleeves. A, B: Neckline drape. B: Long sleeves. C: Scoop neckline and short sleeves. D: Double-layered cowl and sleeveless.

I made a short, almost tunic length version of View B

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Yes except for my changes

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
I’ve made this several times, so I just glanced at the instructions this time. But, this is a very easy to make top. The only slightly tricky part is the shoulder seam/cowl/cowl lining bit. But even that is not complicated.

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
The cowl neck. The front, cowl neck, and cowl neck lining are all cut as one piece. It drapes beautifully.

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Polyester Hacci sweater knit from Fabric Mart

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
I raised the back neck and pulled the sides of the neck/shoulder in to make a rounder, less boaty, neckline.

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and yes

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Butterick 6134

I really like the interesting seam lines on this top. Raglan sleeves with a princess seam is an unusual combination. I also like the funnel neck and variations. The fabric recommendations are wovens like challis and crepe. But I’ve made it twice in knits already, so I know the pattern works for knits, too.

The first make was more or less experimental, to see if the pattern would work in a knit, to try inserting zips into the front raglan seams, and to see just how warm the thin thermal knit fabric actually was. It was actually quite warm for such a lightweight material. The contrasting exposed zips looked good and the pattern worked well in a knit.

So I made it again. This time it became a jacket, by inserting a separating zip in the center front seam and using a metallic abstract print athletic knit.

For this make, I wanted a warm pullover to wear outdoors in cool weather. Things went awry from the instant I opened the pattern envelope, only to discover that the collar facing pieces were missing. All of them. The back neck facing, the front neck facing for both collar styles. I almost put the pattern to one side to choose a different pullover, but then, I thought I might find the pieces as I sewed. So I stuck with this pattern. Spoiler – I did not find the missing pieces.

I used a deep spruce green active wear knit with a soft, flocked twill backing from Fabric Mart. I love the color, but I wish I had added a little bit of contrast like piping. I better not wear this outfit jogging on a dark road at night!!

Something went wrong when I cut out the sleeve pieces. I’m going to blame it on my cat. The top of one sleeve was about 2″ short! So that was the first problem.

Sewing the center back seam on the serger was my second issue. I forgot I had done some faux piping binding with the serger, and did not reset it properly, or more accurately, did not reset it at all. Long story short – the top of the center back seam came out rather chewed up.

Between the chewed up back seam and short sleeve top, I decided to abandon the funnel neck. My solution was to cut the neck down to a simple jewel neck, then add a mock neck, or mock turtleneck, which is really just a thick neck band.

The final stumbling block was finding a thread color for the top stitching. This fabric is distinctly green in person, but sort of a blue spruce kind of green. As a result, the thread that matched the fabric best is actually a dark teal blue, and looks distinctly blue on the spool. I like using variegated thread in the looper when I coverstitch. But, my green variegated thread is bright and leans towards the yellow side of green. It clashed horribly with this dark spruce green. So, I used variegated blue, because that at least sort of goes with the top threads.

I used my own draft from the Fit Nice system to make a pair of simple pull on pants. They are slim but not snug like leggings. They have a simple elastic waist. In the photo they are pinned to the dress form, under the top.

UPDATE: I really did not like the dark, dullness of this make. I want to use this pattern again to make a wool/lycra sweater. I want to emphasize the seam lines with a reverse cover stitch. My Evolve doesn’t do that, so in order to get the looper thread on top, I have to sew upside down. I  decided to experiment on this top, with black and white variegated thread.

It looks much nicer now! The variegated thread highlighting the seams lines adds desperately needed visual interest.

I used cover needles 2 & 3, the center and right most needles. When I use this technique on the next make, I plan to used cover needles 1 & 3 only, the far left and far right. This will make the looper stitch wider and more decorative.

 

 

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Drape Drape 2; One Piece Japanese Asymmetrical Top

When I saw this top on The Great British Sewing Bee Series 3, I was completely fascinated. The contestants were given just the pattern piece, nothing more. They had to figure out how it went together, then sew it. The time limit was 90 minutes,

On the Form

This cute top has a scoop neck and a single side seam, the other side is a fold. It has drop shoulders, one side extending into a cut on sleeve. The hem is steeply asymmetrical, so when the hem is worn level on the body, the folded side falls into lush drapes.

And that’s one key to success with this top. The bottom hem must fit snuggly enough so that the longer, folded stays level on the body with the shorter, non draped side. In other words, this top is ideal for hourglass shaped bodies. My body is not hourglass shaped anymore.

The top is an easy sew, once you’ve figured out how it all fits together. I think that an average sewist, who has the complete pattern piece in the right size, and knows how it goes together, could easily complete this pattern from layout to wearing in 90 minutes.

Tracing the pattern is horrendously difficult. It’s divided into three sections, all superimposed on each other, along with the pattern pieces from three other garments, all printed in lovely shades of gray and blue. None of the pattern sections are labeled. Some labeling is printed around the edges near the sections, and one section has a cf grainline printed on it. If the GBSB contestants had to begin with tracing, they’d need a lot longer than 90 minutes! The hardest part was done for them already!

I cut the large, and the result fits a little too snug through the middle for me, too snug to drape gracefully. This top is a give away.

It was a fun experiment. If I try this top again, I’ll first enlarge the pattern, then add a narrow elastic casing at the bottom to help it stay on my hips.

On a hanger note the asymmetry

I might play with some of the other designs in the future. But, nothing else in this book is on my must-do list.

You might like this book if:
You enjoy Japanese style draped patterns
You don’t mind the crazy tracing

You probably won’t like this book if:
These styles are not your “thing”
You dislike tracing off, especially difficult to follow tracings
You do not fit into the sizes; these patterns don’t look easy to size up.

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Vogue 8539 – Vintage Pattern for a Modern Designer Inspired Style

I really like the gathers/tucks at the left shoulder in this Armani blouse I spotted over the summer. It’s also available in ivory, and a white, long full sleeved version, tunic length in front and knee length in back. And the price?? Forget it!! The ivory version is almost $1800 and the long sleeve version is $3400. For that kind of money I could buy 1,000 yards of silk and make about 300 of these – IF I had or drafted a pattern.

What makes a designer garment special, besides the status associated with the name? Sometimes it’s a unique print that hone sewers can not duplicate. Sometimes it’s a unique construction feature. Solid color silk isn’t cheap, but is readily available, so it’s the unique neck/shoulder that makes this garment different.

Many unique designer styles are available as sewing patterns. Some are pretty much straight out of the envelope, differing from the pattern illustrations and photos only in fabric colors and prints or embellishments. Some designer garments can be duplicated by combining elements from two or more patterns – the bodice from one, sleeves from another, the collar from the third.

But not this one. I searched and searched. I posted on SPR, and got a few suggestions for similar blouses. It looked like I was going to have to draft no matter which pattern I chose. Drafting is not my favorite part of sewing. And I just finished drafting not one but two Leg O Mutton sleeves for another project. So I put the idea to one side.

Then, when looking for a vintage pattern for something else, I stumbled across Very Easy Vogue 8539. It had the gathers and tucks at the left shoulder and nice full sleeves. The illustration on the pattern envelope looks more like a jewel neck than a funnel or turtle neck. But, the technical line drawings show a slightly built up neckline, and the pattern neck is, indeed, built up. Near perfection!!

The only change I made was to eliminate the shoulder pad. I used an invisible zip.

I made it up in a stretch silk in Kelly Green from Fabric Mart a few seasons ago. I think it’s a pretty green for Christmas, and will work for the chilly days of early spring, too.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Loose fitting blouse has raised neckline with tuck variations, slightly extended shoulders, shoulder pads, back zipper and above elbow long sleeves. Narrow hems. A Mock wrap C Barrel Cuffs Purchased belt

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Yes

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
Yes

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
It was exactly what I was looking for!!!

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Stretch Silk from Fabric Mart a few seasons ago

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
Well, the shoulder pads had to go. I used an invisible zip.

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and Yes

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Jalie 2911 – Shawl Collar Pullover Sweater Knit

front

Jalie 2911 is quick, easy and stylish. It can be made for a child (boy or girl) or woman, as it comes in 27 sizes. This long sleeve pullover has only two views, one with a large shawl collar, the other with a hood instead of a collar.

The pattern for the front and back comes in three pieces. An upper front piece, an upper back piece, and a lower front/back piece. The lower pattern piece is matched to either the upper front or upper back, and cut out as one piece (front or back). Then the lower pattern piece is matched to the other upper pattern piece, and cut out as one piece. It’s a clever way of saving on pattern printing costs, and was kind of fun the first couple of times I made this pattern. Then it got old. So, before I did anything else, I traced a copy of the lower piece, then taped the original lower pattern piece to the upper front, and the copy to the upper back. This made two complete pattern pieces, a front and a back.

The pattern allows a very narrow seam allowance. While I often end up with a narrow allowance after serging, I really do not like to start out with such a small amount. I’d rather cut a deeper allowance, machine baste then serge, or sew and trim away excess, and waste a few inches of fabric than cut a narrow allowance and make a mistake that can’t be corrected because there’s no extra seam allowance.

I used a gorgeous rich purple polyester hachi knit from Fabric Mart for this make. I loved the fabric so much that after it arrived, I ordered three more pieces of this hachi knit, in blueberry, green and black (when the next sale came around).

I used a small strip of black twill tape to stabilize the shoulder seams, which I sewed with the narrowest zig zag stitch on my Symphony. I assembled the collar directly on the serger. Then I used the regular machine to zig zag stitch the collar in place. The corners of the collar in front are the ONLY twitchy spots in this top. This time everything came out nice on the very first try, so I went ahead and finished the collar seams with the serger.

back

I’ve made this pattern before. I know it’s on the comfortably large side of things, so I felt safe using the serger to sew the sleeves to the front/back, and the side seams, without any machine basting.

I used my Evolve to coverstitch the hem and sleeve hems. I love using variegated thread in the looper on my hems. But, I didn’t have any that was strictly purple shades, just a purple/pink thread. I did have Rocket Pop, which can look almost purple on the cone because it’s red, white and blue. The white really stands out against the purple, the red and blue look better. I put Purple Variegated Serger Thread on my shopping list for the next purple garment.

I’m really happy with my purple sweater (except maybe for the Rocket Pop Thread). I enjoy making basic wardrobe pieces like this. It’s rewarding to make something that is worn often

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Sewing pattern for long-sleeve pullover and hoodie. Set-in shawl collar (A) or shawl hood (B) Quick and easy to make! Great for boys too!

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
All sizes.

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Yes

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
Yes

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I like the collar

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Polyester hatchi sweater knit from Fabric Mart

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
None

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and Yes

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McCalls 7723 – Sleeves Only

Front

This pattern is all about the sleeves. Dramatic sleeves! The sleeves are what drew me to this pattern. And maybe that’s why I expected View C to be a little bit more dramatic than it actually was.

I used a floral print silk that I got from Ebay a couple of years ago. I used a basic darted, unfitted, button front block, with just the collar band. I wanted to dress it up with a fancier sleeve.

The sleeve may not be as dramatic or exciting as I’d hoped it would be, but I’m thinking that makes it a little less trendy, so style wise it might never look too dated.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Loose fitting tops hae neck sleeve and length variations and back hook and eye closure

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
I used only the sleeve View C. I expected the cuff to be a little deeper than it turned out to be from the illustrations. It’s actually a quite ordinary sleeve

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>

back

The portion of the instructions that I used were clear and accurate

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I used only the sleeve, that’s what drew me to the pattern.

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Floral print stretch silk

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
I used only the sleeve from View C. I used a basic darted but not fitted button front block, with a collar band. When it came to the sleeves, I wanted something with a deeper cuff, and maybe a little fullness at the cuff. I thought that’s what I was getting here, but the cuffs are less deep than I thought.

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
I might try the bodice or the other sleeve options.

 

 

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Butterick 6487 – Hacked with a (Lekala) Flounce

Front

I’m not sure where – or even if! – I saw the inspiration for this holiday blouse. The inspiration, even if it was just in my imagination, was a

Christmas-ey sort of plaid, with a ruffled front and Leg O Mutton sleeves. I think it also had black lace?

I used Butterick 6487 as my base pattern. I like this bodice/collar combination for high necked blouses. Plus, I’ve already done an FBA and moved the zip from back to left side shoulder, so it was the ideal choice.

The ruffle is from Lekala 5874. I made a long sleeved version of this Lekala blouse a few seasons ago. I remembered the ruffle was cut from a single oval shape. It made a lovely shaped ruffle, much nicer and more interesting than anything I could do with plain circle flounces. So I borrowed the ruffle pattern.

The puffy Leg O Mutton sleeves are my own draft. I blogged about making them HERE. I chose the Helen Armstrong method for these sleeves, and used the same pattern piece I used in the Leg O Mutton blog.

The fabric is an awesome yarn dyed cotton from Fabric Mart. The darkest squares are not black, but a deep spruce blue. The color combination says “Wintertime” to me. I want to wear this blouse in a cozy chair near a fireplace with a cup of hot chocolate (maybe with a little chocolate liquor!). It was a dream to work with, and the even, balanced plaid was not hard to match.

The pattern doesn’t have a Center Front seam, but I wanted one to hold the flounce. I carefully laid the front piece out so that a whole stripe would provide seam allowance for a CF seam. Then I forgot to cut the seam allowance! OH NO!!!  I took a deep breath and added a scant 1/2 inch to each side of the front.

Back

I cut out the flounce, sewed it, pressed it and pinned it tino place along one side of the new CF seam. And that’s where I made another mistake. Maybe I mismeasured the inside of the flounce, maybe the inside stretched because I neglected to stay stitch. The reasons really don’t matter because it turned out to be a happy mistake! I started at the bottom, so the excess was all at the top of the blouse, and the innermost sections of the oval flounce pattern. It naturally twirled itself into a sort of flower shape – the PERFECT solution!

I hand stitched the base of the “flower” so it stayed neatly together. I machine basted the flounce into place along the whole CF, leaving the flower sitting at the very top edge, then mahine sewed the CF seam. I finished the raw edges of the CF seam allowance with the serger to prevent raveling.

I sewed the Center Back seam, matching the plaid as best I could, which I think is pretty good. I serged the CB seam from top to bottom. I installed an invisible zip on the left shoulder, then sewed the right shoulder seam. I used a piece of black twill tape to prevent the seam from stretching. The zip in the left shoulder seam will do the same for the left side.

I sewed the side seams and assembled the neck band. I pinned the neck band to the neck from left shoulder around the back to the right shoulder. I gathered the front bodice and pinned the neck band to the front, working from the left shoulder to the center front and from the right shoulder to the center front, making sure the gathers were even on both sides of the front. Then I tucked the base of the flower into the seam between the front and the neck band. It was thick. Really thick. Too thick to sew through the base of the flower with the machine, so that little bit of seam is sewn by hand. The inside facing at that point is also tacked down by hand.

The sleeves were my own design. I had to alter the pattern slightly to match the arm hole. I sewed the underam seam on the serger, machine sewed them into the blouse, and when I was happy with the way they looked, I serged the armhole/sleeve seam. Then I serged the edges of the side seams.

Side

The last construction step was hemming the blouse. The back is a few inches longer than the front, both are turned under twice and topstitched. The sleeves are also hemmed by turning under twice and topstitching. The final touch is three tiny decorative gold buttons on each sleeve, and one button tucked inside the flounce flower.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>

Fitted pullover tops have sleeve and neck variations and optional contrast yoke. Back Zip

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>
Regular Misses

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
I made several design changes, so no.

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
I did my own thing this time, so I didn’t use the instructions.

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I like the gathered neckline

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Cotton plaid from Fabric Mart

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
Moved the zip from back to left shoulder. Did a FBA. Added a Center Front seam with a flounce. Used my own Leg O Mutton sleeve.

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes and Yes

 

 

 

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Sew Iconic – Book Review

Sew Iconic is a collection of patterns for 10 famous dresses from 10 classic movies. The book includes full size pattern pieces for each dress – but one size only. So chances are you’ll need to resize the patterns to fit you.

<b>Book Index/Chapter headings</b>
Introduction
Materials & Techniques
Julia Roberts – Polka Dot Dress from Pretty Woman
Audrey Hepburn – Black Dress from Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Jennifer Grey – Pink Mambo Dress from Dirty Dancing
Marilyn Monroe – White Halter Dress from Seven Year Itch
Keira Knightley – Evening Gown from Atonement
Catherine Zeta Jones – Showgirl Dress from Chicago
Grace Kelly – Blue Chiffon Gown from To Catch a Thief
Rita Hayworth – Sheath Gown from Gilda
Faye Dunaway – Coat Dress from The Thomas Crown Affair
Kate Winslet – Evening Gown from Titanic
Glossary of Sewing Terms
Index

<b>PaperBack or HardBound?</b>
Harbound

<b>Does this book have clear illustrations or photographs?</b>
Yes

<b>Would you recommend this book as a MUST HAVE?</b>
No, not a must have, but fun if you want to recreate these dresses

The Materials and Techniques chapter discusses, well, you guessed it – materials and techniques! It starts with a chart of the sewing techniques needed for each dress, followed by a list of basic sewing supplies accompanied by a nice photo of each item. It has a clear illustration showing how to measure yourself and explains in detail how to trace off the pattern pieces. Using the first dress to illustrate the example, it identifies the component pieces (front, back, facings). It devotes several pages to explaining how to resize the pieces to fit you, which is VERY important because the pattern is only one size. The chapter continues with explanations on how to lay out and cut your resized pattern pieces, including a diagram of on-grain and bias layouts. It covers fabrics for the garments, linings and facings, and explains stay stitching, basting, gathering, draping and cutting, darts, different kinds of seams, hems and fasteners.

Each of the dress chapters starts out with a discussion of the actress who wore the dress, the movie, the designer and the dress itself. Then it moves on to making the dress itself, including a supply list, recommended fabrics. It guides you through cutting out the pieces, assembling the dress, adding finishing touches to recreate the look from the movie, and a How To Work It section, which talks about where/when/what kind of events the dress is appropriate for, make up suggestions, accessory suggestions, and alterations to personalize it for yourself.

All of the recreation examples are spot-on except the last one, the Titanic gown. Because the original gown used expensive glass beaded net, the book suggests substituting lace weighted with trim to capture the effect.

The Glossary of Sewing Terms is just that – a condensed explanation of sewing terms.

I have NOT tried to use the patterns yet, so I can NOT comment on their accuracy.

This book is a fun read and ideal if you want to recreate these dresses exactly
or to create designs based on/inspired by these dresses

I also enjoyed the brief discussions of the dress designer. Like most other behind-the-scenes people, they are vital to movie making, but seldom get the spot light.

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