Tag Archives: Butterick pattern

Butterick 5954 Again!

This make was a spontaneous spur of the moment kind of thing. I had just put the pattern away in the pattern drawer, and was digging through my stash looking for a piece for a different project. I came across this amazing Lilly Pad Green chenille design crepe knit. I knew I had to make it up in a short sleeve version of this Butterick  pattern, so I went right back to the pattern drawer and pulled it back out.

At first I was afraid I would not have enough fabric to get all the pieces going in the same direction. I decided if one big piece had to be upside down, it would be the front overlap. And, if necessary, I could cut the sleeves on the cross grain. But luckily I was able to get all the pieces, including the sleeves, going in the right direction.

I used a coverstitch on the hem again, but this time I had a little trouble with the thread breaking. I don’t know why. I used a mini-cowl for the collar and added a couple of  green glass buttons for extra color. I used the short sleeves, but instead of hemming them up all the way around I tacked the hem up in just a few spots, and added a button, so the sleeves have a little bit of poof at the bottom.

I love the softness, texture and color of the fabric. And I love the long, full back on this pattern. The line drawing really doesn’t show just how full the back is.


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Butterick 6487 The Real Make

SilkblouseoneI rarely make samples or mock ups, but I’m glad I did with Butterick 6487. I did it because I was afraid the design changes I made would cause a problem. Instead, I made several silly mistakes, and I’m glad I got them out of the way on the sample blouse!

For this make I used a floral print silk crepe de chine from Fabric Mart. The piece was barely enough for blouse and long ties, even a tiny cutting mistake could ruin the project completely!

Learning from my sleeve mistake on the previous make, I double checked each pattern piece to be sure it was the correct piece. The ties are rectangles cut on the cross gran from the little bit of fabric left after cutting out the blouse.

I also remembered my vent mistake on the previous make. This time I used a piece of super light weight fusible interfacing on the spot where the sleeve is slit, to prevent raveling. The pattern suggests a narrow hem on the slit, but I prefer faced slits. So I cut a piece of scrap into a rectangle, and interfaced it with the same super light weight fusible. I placed the facing face down on the right side of the sleeve. I stitched along the stitching lines, using a shorter stitch (1.8) near the top and taking two stitches across the top. Then I cut the slit as close as I could possibly get to the two top stitches. I didn’t have to worry about anything fraying or raveling because both sleeve and facing are fused to interfacing. Then, I pushed the facing through to the right side, pressed it in place, and topstitched.

The rest went together so easily there isn’t much to say. The ties are slightly wider than the neckband, and slightly gathered where they are attached to the neckband.

I LOVE the ties! They are so much fun. I wore it with a bow tied on the left side, but it could easily tie on the right as well. The photos here show the blouse with the tie as I wore it, with a bow tied low in front, with a bow tied low in back, and with the ties wrapped once around the neck and draped dramatically over the shoulders and down the back.

In the photos, the ties sort of blend into the top. IRL the ties stand out more clearly.


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Butterick 6487 Test Run

Inspired by a designer blouse, I wanted to make Butterick  6487 with a couple of potentially complicated alterations. I wanted to move the zipper from back to left shoulder. A zipper on the left shoulder is easier for me to do than one in back. My plan included long ties at the neck that could be tied many different ways, including at the back of the neck and draping down the back. So moving the zipper to the left shoulder keeps it out of the way.

The other potentially troublesome alteration was an FBA. Following the advice from the helpful members of Sewing Pattern Review Forum, I added side darts.

If I was doing just one alteration or the other, in a moderate or cheap fabric, I’d just dive in and do it. But, I planned to use a piece of silk crepe de chine from Fabric Mart. It was a pricier fabric, and no more was available.

So for this make I used some floral rayon challis from my stash, leftovers from a different project. To dress it up a bit I decided to cover the collar and cuffs with scraps of black lace.  I skipped the ties on the sample top.

The FBA went smoothly, and inserting an invisible zipper in the left shoulder seam was surprisingly easy. In fact, everything went together smoothly, until it came time to apply the cuffs to the sleeves. And then I realize I omitted the vent in the sleeve, and the cuff is huge. It flops over my hand. Adding a vent at this stage is trickier than installing a vent while the sleeve is still flat. A vent is a lot of extra steps; cutting the facing or binding, interfacing the opening, installing the vent itself, then the cuff. I’m not sure how easy it will be to put a buttonhole in lace covered fabric.

Throwing caution to the wind I decide to make faux cuffs, permanently sewn closed, just big enough for my hand to slip through. I’ll use the same technique used to attach a ribbed cuff to a knit sleeve, by gathering the end of the sleeve, slipping the sleeve inside the cuff, lining up raw edges and notches, serging the cuff to the sleeve and finally flipping the cuff down.

I start by pinning the cuffs to the proper size, with a red pin holding the inside lap, a blue pin marking the outside overlap, and a white pin matching the button position. I’m not going to do a buttonhole, I’ll just sew the button to all layers of cuff.

Lace band inserted into the sleeve

I start with the sleeves right side out. I mark the notch on the outside/backside of the sleeve with a blue pin. I turned the cuff inside out, slipped it over the sleeve, and lined up the blue pins. I adjusted the gathers evenly around the cuff, and sewed it to the sleeve.

Amazingly, it worked! Then, I closed the cuff and sewed on a permanent decorative button.

Next I attached the sleeves to the bodice, and tried it on. That’s when I discovered Big Mistake Number Two.

The sleeve was way too short and a little weird. What went wrong?? Well, me, of course, I used the WRONG pattern piece!!

I wasn’t giving up on this top! I picked a spot about 4″ about the cuff, and cut the cuff off the sleeve. I used the very last bit of black lace scraps to make wide bands that I inserted into the sleeve. The band extended the sleeve enough so that it fits comfortably. And because I used the same lace on the cuffs and collar it actually looks intentional!

Invisible zip in left shoulder. The zipper tails are not sewn down yet

In spite of the mistakes, the odd corrections, and the fact that the lace and fabric are scraps from other projects this blouse came out nice.

<b>Pattern Description: </b>
Misses blouse with gather detail mock neck, cuff or ruffle sleeve, and optional contrast yoke

<b>Pattern Sizing:</b>

<b>Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?</b>
Yes, in spite of all my errors, it does look like the pattern envelope!

<b>Were the instructions easy to follow?</b>
Yes, the instructions were clear and correct

<b>What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?</b>
I like the gathering at the mock neck. I did not like the zipper in the back seam

<b>Fabric Used:</b>
Floral rayon challis and black lace. Both are scraps from previous projects

<b>Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:</b>
FBA by adding side darts. Moved the zipper from the back to the left shoulder. The cuffs are mock cuffs, due to my mistake. I added a wide lace band on the lower part of the sleeve, again to correct my mistake

<b>Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?</b>
Yes, I would sew this again. As a matter of fact, this particular blouse is actually a test make for another blouse from this pattern

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Butterick 5954 knit pullover top

Butterick 5954 is an easy, elegant pullover top. I was drawn to the wrap effect with a cowl neck. Cowls are big this year, and I’m happy about that! I missed the full, deep cowl necks from the 1970s.

I used an Aegean blue jacquard knit from Fabric Mart. I made the long sleeved version with the cowl neck. I love it! It’s soft and comfortable. I love the high-low hemline and the super full, swishy back.

This is a very easy pattern, especially views A & B . Views C & D are very easy too, but the construction sequence is a little different. The side seams are sewn and the bottom is hemmed before the shoulder seams are sewn. This is so the finished hem edge is tucked neatly into the shoulder seam. The front is essentially two front pieces, one over the other.

I used my coverstitch machine to finish the hem. The only seams I machine based were the shoulder seams and the armhole seams. Everything else I serged on the first pass. I must say construction goes a lot faster this way!

But I’m glad I basted the shoulder seams, because on the first try, I mixed up the right and left sides. I have dyslexia, so sometimes that happens. I just undid the basting, and tried again. The second time I got it right, so I serged the shoulder seams.

The full swishy back. It’s much nicer in person

I serged the sleeves, and finished them with a coverstitch.

I used the two pass method to attach the cowl. First I lined up one raw edge of the cowl with the raw edge of the neck and stitched it. Then I folded the collar, and stitched in the ditch

Pattern Description:
Easy knit pullover tunic. Close-fitting and flared, pullover tunic has front variations, high-low hemline and narrow hem. Wrong side shows on back hemline. A, B: Scoop neckline. A: Sleeveless. B: Three-quarter sleeves. C: Short sleeves. D: Long sleeves. C, D: Cowl collar and overlapping tulip hem.

Pattern Sizing:

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?
Yes, it did. Except prettier!

Were the instructions easy to follow?
Yes, they were easy. Views C & D use an unusual construction sequence because of the wrap front, but it’s logical and easy to follow

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?
The long full swishy back!

Fabric Used:
Poly knit jacquard in Aegean blue

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?
Yes to both! I would sew it again (in fact, I already did) and yes, I would recommend it to others

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Boucle and Denim Jacket

After making a double breasted coat dress, and covering boots to match, I still had a little bit of this wonderful green and black boucle left. I decided to use it in a jacket mixed with some black denim.

Denim is sturdy, but the boucle is soft, so I realized I’d probably be reinforcing the boucle in some way, with interfacing or lining. I decided on a jeans jacket sort of style, using the boucle for the front and back yoke and sleeves. I chose Butterick 5616 for the longer, hip length version. I wanted cuffed sleeves, so I lengthen them a bit and drafted my own cuff pattern.

I thought long and hard about pockets, but, eventually I decided to omit the pockets for a cleaner look. I added a decorative cap on the sleeves, and used bright sliver, textured buttons.

I did the topstiching according to the pattern, but the black thread disappeared against the black denim, but it still helped the jacket get crisp clean lines.

The pattern doesn’t call for lining, but that’s how I decided to handle the boucle. I used plain black poylester.

This jacket took a lot of time to make. Topstitching is always time consuming, and there’s quite a bit on this jacket. Drafting the cuff pattern, creating the little lap in the sleeve (so I can open the cuff), and adding the lining all took extra time. I planed to have the jacket ready for spring, but it wasn’t finished until recently.

Pattern Description: Unlined jackets with top stitching and pockets. Three quarter sleeves or sleeveless. Waist or hip length

Pattern Sizing: Misses

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Except for my design changes, yes. I used boucle for the front and back yokes and sleeves.

Were the instructions easy to follow? Yes, the instructions were accurate and easy to understand. All the notches lined up, etc.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? I like the longer length without the band at the bottom. I didn’t like the sleeves, but fixed that by adding my own cuffs.

Fabric Used: Black denim and a wonderful green boucle

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: Lengthened the sleeve a bit and added cuffs. Added little denim sleeve caps to separate the boucle sleeves from the boucle yokes

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? Would I sew it again? Maybe. If I wanted another jeans jacket -like jacket. Right now, though, it’s not on my “Must Make Another Right Away” list. Would I recommend it to others? Yes

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Butterick 5030 Wrap Dress

I don’t remember when or where I got this blue/grey hydrangea print in stretch cotton, but when I rediscovered it in my stash I just had to make something with it. I decided on a summer wrap dress.

Wrap dresses can be tricky. The front often gapes, even when the bust fits nicely, and the front opening can be quite low. I usually have to do FBAs. But oddly, the FBA on this dress gave me almost too much room in front. Another issue is that wrap dresses tend to fit figures with a narrow waist much better than figures like mine, with a straighter line, but that isn’t a problem with this dress.

The pattern was not hard to assemble. I extended the band from the bodice down through the skirt.

Pattern Description: Wrap dress

Pattern Sizing: Misses

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Yes, it does.

Were the instructions easy to follow? Yes, the instructions were clear. Notches lined up and pieces fit together

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

Fabric Used:  Stretch cotton in a wonderful blue floral print

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:  I finished the skirt panels with a band like the neck and bodice

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?Yes, I recommend this dress, it’s an ideal basic wrap dress pattern.


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Pattern Review Butterick 6134

This pattern is intended to be a woven or firm knit zip up the back top. I changed it into a zip up the front activewear jacket.

Butterick 6134 in metallic activewear from Fabric Mart

Butterick 6134 in metallic activewear from Fabric Mart

This pattern had the design lines I was looking for in a jacket; raglan sleeves, princess seaming and a funnel neck.

My starting point was view D, because that view had long sleeves, a front seam and an open neck. I omitted the little vents at the bottom and moved the zipper from back to front.

I chose a bright turquoise and metallic silver active wear print from Fabric Mart. The fabric doesn’t like heat, making it difficult to press. I didn’t get a photo of the sticky tag, or for that matter, any photos of this jacket as a work in progress.

I chose a white zipper with silver metal teeth and a decorative pull, and inserted it exposed. The major assembly seams, princess, side, underarm and raglan shoulder, were sewn directly on the serger. The other seams were first sewn with a zigzag stitch. Then the jacket was tried on and any needed adjustments were made before the seams were “finalized” with the serger. I used a sliver metallic thread and a decorative stitch for topstitching around the neck, along each side of the zipper and around the hem.

The pattern itself is pretty easy. The only potentially tricky part is around the funnel neck. I’d make it again, as a kit top or jacket. I’m sure this pattern would look lovely in a woven fabric, but I suggest testing for fit before cutting your fabric.

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